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Long-finned Pike

Long-finned Pike

Dinolestes lewini

Long-finned pike is the only representative in the family Dinolestidae, and is most closely related to the cardinalfishes.  Similar in appearance to the barracuda and snook, the long-finned pike has an elongate silver body, with yellow fins and a long anal fin and a pointed head with a large mouth and large eyes.

Endemic to southern Australian temperate waters from Rottnest Island, WA to Port Macquarie, NSW, the long-finned pike exists in various habitats from shallow seagrass beds to deep offshore near reefs to depths of 65 metres.  They are often seen alone or in pairs, occasionally forming large schools.  Long-finned pike grow to a maximum length of 90 centimetres.

Other common names include:  Longfin pike, yellowfin pike

Occurrence at the Busselton Jetty: 

Long-finned pike are one of the three main schooling species that frequent the underwater observatory on a regular basis.  They are a spectacular silvery sight as they weave in and out of the jetty piles from the midwater down to the seafloor.

Image by: Busselton Jetty Inc.