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Striped Trumpeter

Striped Trumpeter

Pelates octolineatus

The striped trumpeter is a member of the grunter family.  The characteristics of this family are a perch-like appearance, two spines on each opercula and a swim bladder attached by muscles to the back of the skull.  The name ‘grunter’ was derived from the croaking sound which is produced when the animal is stressed, as it expands and contracts these muscles.  The striped trumpeter are silvery to light brown in colouration and have six longitudinal stripes which fade ventrally, and a fully spotted tail.  Juvenile striped trumpeter are greenish, and are camouflaged well in their seagrass environment.

Adult striped trumpeter are found in abundance along the edges of seagrass beds and coastal rocky reefs to 15 metres depth, from Broome, WA to Gulf St Vincent, SA.  This species are omnivores, with the algae growing on seagrass the predominant component of their diet.  Striped trumpeter grow to a maximum length of 28 centimetres.

Other common names include:  Western striped trumpeter

 

Occurrence at the Busselton Jetty:

Striped trumpeter are relatively common, occurring in large, dense schools often swimming through the littoral zone encircling jetty piles.

Image by: O. Rynvis