|
|
|
Sweep; Banded

Sweep; Banded

Scorpis geogiana

The banded sweep is one of the largest species in the sweep family, reaching a maximum of 46 centimetres.  Their dorsal and anal fins are arranged symmetrically on the body, with a dark forked caudal fin.  They differ from the sea sweep by having dark, almost black, vertical bands down the body and a less strongly forked tail.  They are shiny silvery blue in colouration with yellow markings on the lower lip.  Juveniles are very deep-bodied, elongating slightly as they mature.

The banded sweep inhabit shallow reefs in the subtidal to depths of 2 to 35 metres.  This species tends to be less active than other sweeps and often remains close to caves and ledges in the reef.  They are midwater feeders, consuming algae ad zooplankton.  Their range is restricted to southern Australian waters from Coral Bay, WA to Kangaroo Island, SA and around New Zealand.

 

Occurrence at the Busselton Jetty:

The banded sweep is relatively common, though not as common as the sea sweep.  Easy to distinguish by the dark vertical bands down the body, both juveniles and adults can be observed frequenting the waters surrounding the Busselton Jetty.  Banded sweeps are often seen swimming through the open water and littoral zones, occasionally pausing to feed upon the invertebrate and algae adorned piles.